BOOKS

Below are books written about the sex trafficking/ sex slavery industry within the past 3 years.

  • THE WHISTLEBLOWER: SEX TRAFFICKING, MILITARY CONTRACTORS, AND ONE WOMAN’S FIGHT FOR JUSTICE by Kathryn Bolkovac and Cari Lynn. Published 2011

From Booklist:
Bolkovac, who worked as part of the UN peacekeeping mission in Bosnia in the late 1990s, provides yet another perspective on why private military contracting has encroached on U.S. foreign policy, threatening our image, national security, and the lives of those we are supposed to be protecting. A police officer turned human rights investigator, she worked at uncovering international sex trafficking and cover-ups by her bosses at DynCorp International, which led to her firing, a mad rush across the border, and a subsequent wrongful termination lawsuit in which she was victorious and became the self-described poster girl for everything wrong about security-for-hire. Most galling is the sad truth that DynCorp answered to no law, nor to the military, the U.S., or the Bosnians. The criminality, including rape and murder, committed by corporate military contractors has proliferated in the past decade, and Bolkovac’s cautionary tale ends on the sourest of notes. DynCorp won another federal contract on the heels of her lawsuit, and no one was prosecuted for crimes against the women whose lives she struggled to save. Infuriating and heartbreaking. –Colleen Mondor

  • SEX TRAFFICKING: INSIDE THE BUSINESS OF MODERN DAY SLAVERY by Siddarth Kara. Published 2010

Kara, a former investment banker and executive, uses theoretical economics and business analysis to propose measures that could eradicate sex trafficking by undermining the profitability of the illegal activities associated with the crime. At considerable personal risk and expense—he is nearly attacked by a gang of pimps in Mumbai—the author penetrates seedy underworlds and forced labor markets to meet the women and children in the dungeon of human disgrace in Asia, Europe and the U.S. He highlights ubiquitous and disturbing trends—the heavy involvement of law enforcement agencies and personnel in trafficking and slavery—but this book’s intentions suffers from Kara’s self-professed rudimentary economic analysis, which often borders on the offensive (a theoretical calculation of the lifetime value of a sex slave) and an unscientific, ad hoc research model. While the evidence indicates the urgent need for action—a woman or child is trafficked for sexual exploitation every 60 seconds—Kara’s economic approach fails to shed new light on the human cost of sex slavery and seems at the best of times beside the point, although the detailed statistical information he compiles—on everything from the costs of running a brothel in Queens, N.Y., to massage parlor and bonded labor economics worldwide—is a resource for researchers in the field. (Jan.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • SEX TRAFFICKING: A GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE by Kimberly A. McCabe and Sabita Manian. Published 2010

From Amazon.com: This book targets sex trafficking within every geographic region and it provides a general profile of the geographic regions in terms of demographic characteristics and political conditions that may support the growth of sex trafficking. It is written on a basic information-supply-level to provide readers with a foundation on human trafficking throughout the world.

  • SEX TRAFFICKING IN SOUTH ASIA: TELLING MAYA’S STORY by Mary Crawford. Published 2010

From Amazon.com: This book is a critical feminist analysis of sex trafficking. Arguing that trafficking in girls and women is a product of the social construction of gender and other dimensions of power and status within a particular culture and at a particular historical moment, this book offers the necessary locally grounded analysis.

Focusing on the case of Nepal, from where 5,000 to 7,000 thousands of Nepali girls and women are trafficked each year primarily to India, Mary Crawford assesses how the social construction of trafficking – the concept and its representation in discourse – are influenced by the dynamics of gender, caste, and the development establishment. The defining figure is an innocent, naïve young girl being lured or duped into leaving the safety of her village. The trafficking victim is portrayed as “backward”; however, she is “backward” in specific ways that resonate with Nepal’s struggle to resist and yet encompass Western influence. This view may lead to paradoxical effects in which efforts to protect girls and women instead restrict their human rights. Rather than seeing women as universalized victims, Crawford assesses how the social construction of trafficking in a particular society affects girls and women who live in that society.

In this book, the author’s voice as a woman, a feminist, and a social scientist immersed in a “foreign” way of life, illuminates aspects of this process and highlights the subjectivity of urban women. It makes the connection between Nepali subjectivities and a problem of international significance, the trafficking of girls and women. The book provides a model for other locally grounded accounts of sex trafficking to counter the universalizing rhetoric of the mass media and some anti-trafficking activists, filling a niche in South Asian Studies and Women’s Studies.

  • MIGRATION, AGENCY AND CITIZENSHIP IN SEX TRAFFICKING by Rutvica Andrijasevic. Published 2010

Fro Amazon.com: Providing a new perspective on migration and sex work in Europe, this book is based on interviews with migrant women in the sex sector. It brings together issues of migration, labour and political subjectivity in order to refocus scholarly and policy agenda away from sex slavery and organized crime, towards agency and citizenship.

  • TERRIFIY NO MORE: YOUNG GIRLS HELD CAPTIVE AND THE DARING UNDERCOVER OPERATION TO WIN THEIR FREEDOM (Authors: Gary A. Haugen and Gregg Hunter. Published 2010)

Haugen, president of the Christian humanitarian organization International Justice Mission, peoples this account of IJM’s efforts to rescue young girls from forced prostitution in Svay Pak, Cambodia, with larger-than-life heroes and villains. Written with the aid of communications consultant Hunter, the story, played for all its terrible drama, tells of girls sold into sex slavery by their families or tricked into it by the promise of legitimate work. IJM members, posing as customers, infiltrated the brothels, interviewed the girls and later staged successful rescue operations. Haugen credits the success of his work to God (“I believe we all yearn for the joy that arrives… when we find our own active place in the struggle against evil and discover the transforming power of life the Divine has granted to mere mortals”) and shrugs off doubters (“Some Christians are uncomfortable with the idea that God has been in a dark, repulsive brothel…. Our investigators are not only comfortable with the idea—it’s a truth they count on”). Haugen describes other IJM victories, including a raid on a South Asia brick kiln that relies on slave labor, but the focus is on the sex trade and the palpable zeal with which IJM fights it.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • INVISIBLE CHAINS: CANADA’S UNDERGROUND WORLD OF HUMAN TRAFFICKING (Author: Benjamin Perrin. Published 2010)

From Amazon.com: Just outside Toronto, a 14-year-old Canadian girl was auctioned on the internet for men to purchase by the hour. A young woman was taken by slave traders from an African war zone to Edmonton to earn greater profits by exploiting her in prostitution. A gang called Wolfpack recruited teenagers in Quebec and sold them for sex to high-profile men in the community.

The global problem of human trafficking is only beginning to be recognized in Canada, even though it has been hidden in plain sight. In Invisible Chains, Benjamin Perrin, an award-winning law professor and policy expert, exposes cases of human trafficking, recording in-depth interviews with people on the front lines–police officers, social workers, and the victims themselves–and bringing to light government records released under access-to-information laws.

  • INTERNATIONAL SEX TRAFFICKING OF WOMEN & CHILDREN (Authors: Leonard Territo and George Kirkham. Published 2009)

From Amazon.com:

The most vulnerable are being victimized

– Gain insight from top experts on the methods & practices of the criminals behind this “human tragedy of monumental proportions”.
– Get current intelligence on trafficking tactics and trends in North & South America, Europe, Asia, Australia and Africa, plus get insider information directly from the traffickers.
Important for:
Law Enforcement
Criminal Justice Classes
Sociologists
Women’s Group
Travel Professionals
Social Workers
  • SEX TRAFFICKING (Authors: Marie Segrave, Sanja Milivojevic and Sharon Pickering. Published 2009)
From Amazon.com: Trafficking in persons, particularly the trafficking of women into sexual servitude (sex trafficking) has generated much attention over the past decade. This book provides a critical examination of the international and national frameworks developed to respond to this issue – focused both on the design of policy responses and their implementation. Uniquely it brings together, and brings to life, the voices of policymakers, non-government agencies and trafficked women. The analysis is grounded in rich empirical work and research in Europe, Asia, Australia and North America 

This book examines how sex trafficking has been mobilized within anti-trafficking policies across the globe and offers a close examination of the dominant international framework, drawing upon a rich and diverse set of case studies: Australia, Serbia and Thailand. This analysis draws upon over100 interviews with trafficking ‘experts’ across the three nations-including policymakers, police, immigration authorities, socialworkers, lawyers, UN agencies, local and international NGOs, activists. Critically, it also draws upon the voices of women who have been trafficked.

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